The Verdant Revival

In my last status update, I promised that I’d reveal the title of my trilogy as a way of celebrating the completion of the current draft of the first book, Yesterday’s Demons.

ProjectTracker-2015-11-05

As of late last night, the current draft of Yesterday’s Demons is 100% complete. That means, as promised, it’s time to reveal the trilogy’s title.

The Verdant Revival

I wanted the title to describe the span of time the trilogy covers, like a name historians might use to refer to that era. The Verdant Revival fits that perfectly.

ForestRoad
Photo credit: Studio Dekorasyon

The trilogy takes place on the dying planet Verde. Two hundred years earlier, the Blackout destroyed all technology. In its wake, magic disappeared, and much of the world became Terrascorcha: a toxic wasteland where only monsters can survive. The survivors were forced to migrate to what came to be known as the occupied territories: a hot, dusty region with sparse cacti and scrub brush. It’s a harsh, broken place that is yearning for change.

“Verde” is a proper noun in my fictional world and “Verdant” is its demonym. But in the real world, verde is Spanish and Italian for green. It gives us the adjective “verdant” meaning green in color or green with growing plants. Green is a color associated with a good status, with go, and with life.

Merriam-Webster defines “Revival” as a period of growth, or a period in which something once-popular becomes popular again. It’s a word common in spirituality. Matt Maher’s “Burning in My Soul” is a song of praise and worship to the Holy Spirit. “We’re calling for revival!” Maher sings. The fruits of such a revival would likely be the gifts of the Holy Spirit, including wisdom, understanding, counsel, knowledge, and fortitude.

Put all that together, and you have a term that describes the restoration of a harsh, broken place to the gleaming world it once was. The same term also describes the transformation of young adults into the heroes their world needs them to be. Either way, it’s a term that carries all sorts of hints about my story’s plot and tone.

The Verdant Revival.

What’s funny is this was one of the first titles I came up with, but I rejected it for various reasons. I worked my way through several others and even had settled on a different one for a while, but I was never satisfied and I kept tinkering. Only once I decided The Verdant Revival was the official title did I stop having the desire to fidget with it. Oh, ye INFJ, when will you learn to trust your intuition?

November Status Update

One month ago, the current draft of Yesterday’s Demons was 65% complete. What say you now, Project Tracker?

ProjectTracker-2015-11

90%! I’m pleased with the progress I made last month. At this pace, the draft will be finished this month.

I also estimate progress on the outline for book two of the trilogy at 3%. I haven’t committed much of the outline to bits, but a lot of it exists in engrams inside my brain. And I’ve been creating and listening to the book’s soundtrack playlist. That is a big step in my writing process. The right songs help me visualize the book’s key scenes, and the rest of the chapters fall into place around those. I’m listening to that playlist as I type these words.

And by the way, this trilogy has a title, and I’ll reveal it when I finish the current draft of Yesterday’s Demons as a way to celebrate.

My audience is currently small but is made up entirely of loyal friends and true. I thank all of you for your support. I couldn’t do this without you.

Deus vobiscum.

Mad-Eye Moody’s Advice for Writers, Part 2

HP04_CH013
Illustration by Mary GrandPré

This two-part series is about Mad-Eye Moody’s advice to Harry Potter on how to successfully pass the First Task of the Triwizard Tournament. Part one covered play to your strengths.

Bring What You Need
For Harry, this meant using a summoning charm to bring him his Quidditch broom. For the writer, this means making sure you have all of the tools you need.

Unless you write everything longhand, your most valuable tool is likely your keyboard. Are you able to type well on yours? Do your fingers hurt after sprinting out a couple thousand words? Are the keys so close together that you regularly make fat-finger typos? Software engineer Scott Hanselman likes to say, “There are a finite number of keystrokes left in your hands before you die.” If your keyboard doesn’t feel like an extension of your fingers, rip it out and get a new one. Do you use a laptop that has a bad keyboard? Get a new laptop, or just get a good new USB keyboard, or get a docking station with which you can use a new keyboard. When you sit down to write, bring what you need.

What software are you using to compose and save your hard work? Is Microsoft Word working out OK for you? Do you wish you could use something more powerful, something more geared for professional writers like Scrivener? What are you waiting for? Bring what you need.

Do you like what you’ve written but wish you could get another opinion? Bring what you need and find yourself a writing critique group. Do you wish you had a paper notebook to carry with you wherever you go to jot down ideas as they come to you? Go to the nearest office supply store and get what you need. Do you really wish you had a more powerful grammar checker? Subscribe to Grammarly and bring what you need.

This is your writing. This is what is likely one of the most important things in your world. Why on Earth would you not equip yourself with tools to help you do it to the best of your ability? Bring what you need. If there is some physical or bit-based or human resource that you need, buy or find or hire that tool. And do it yesterday.

And yes, I get it that sometimes the best tools cost the money you need to pay the rent and put Ramen on the table. I’m not saying you should become a starving artist (though I do like to support starving artists when I can). All I’m saying is if writing is a must and not a should to you, the tools that will best let you do it are necessities, not luxuries.

Treating yourself well is like casting a summoning charm: accio success!

Mad-Eye Moody’s Advice for Writers, Part 1

HP04_CH013
Illustration by Mary GrandPré

One of my favorite scenes in the Harry Potter series is the scene in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire in which Mad-Eye Moody gave Harry advice. To steal an egg from a dragon for the first task of the Triwizard Tournament, Moody suggested that Harry play to his strengths and bring what he needed. For Harry, this meant using a summoning charm to retrieve his Firebolt so that he could utilize his Quidditch skills in the execution of the task. The result was the moment where Harry shouted, “Accio Firebolt!” and his Quidditch broom soared from the castle and came to his side, and it was awesome.

Moody’s advice is exceptional not just for a boy wizard, but also for writers.

Play to your strengths
Especially if your writing isn’t currently paying your rent, you’re probably writing because you just need to. “A writer always writes,” said Rachel Balducci. “And not because of the need to produce as much as the need to just exhale. Verbally/mentally/emotionally speaking.”

If that’s the case, you’d better not be wasting your time writing anything other than exactly what you want to write.

For example, a standard piece of advice for writers is: practice your craft on short stories, make a few sales, get a few published credits, and then attempt a novel. And that is good advice. It worked pretty well for Stephen King, among many others. But what if you don’t want to write short stories? What if you just want to be a novelist? In that case, Mad-Eye Moody growls, “Think now. What are you best at? Play to your strengths.

It also happens that a writer comes up with a great story and tells it very well, but it gets rejected by agent after agent and publisher after publisher because it doesn’t fit neatly into preconceived genres. If that happens to you, should you rewrite the story to neatly fit expectations? No, not unless you want Moody’s magic eye to swivel in your direction. Play to your strengths. After all, children’s books weren’t supposed to be about babies from murdered families who grew up among vampires and werewolves until Neil Gaiman won the Newberry Medal for The Graveyard Book.

This advice applies to a writer in so many more ways. How does it apply to you? Think about what you’re best at and what you love the most. Are you in some way applying that to your writing? Why not? Play to your strengths. They’re uniquely yours, and the world is waiting to see the fruits of them.

(Continued in Part 2: Bring What You Need.)

October Status and Announcement

books-769099_1280

My last status update was a big one. In it I announced that I’d decided to independently publish Yesterday’s DemonsNow, two months later, I estimate the third draft of the novel is 65% complete. I’m very happy with the progress I’ve been making.

But back when I decided to independently publish, another question I’d been pondering instantly became a no-brainer. So here’s today’s announcement:

Yesterday’s Demons will be book one of a trilogy.

I know, this probably isn’t a huge surprise. Isn’t it the law in 47 states that all fantasy novels must be part of at least a trilogy if not a longer series? But I’d resisted allowing myself to think too much about the larger story I wanted to tell until I’d secured a publisher. Once I did, the floodgates opened. So in addition to all of the work I’ve been doing on the latest draft of Yesterday’s Demons, I’ve also been giving a lot of preliminary thought to the next two books. I wouldn’t call this thought “Book 2 Pre-Writing” just yet. But it’s close.

Finally, eagle-eyed readers will note that I’ve removed Simon Bradley and the X-Ray Specs from the Project Tracker over in the sidebar. I only did this because it had been sitting there at 100% complete for some time now. I do still plan to return to that book and get a second draft of it completed, but right now, I’m focused on my trilogy.

Lots of other great stuff keeps happening behind the scenes, and when I have more to report, I’ll report it here. Thanks so much for your support and for reading.

Deus vobiscum.

We’re making up new punctuation now‽

RhetoricalQuestionMark

I knew that National Grammar Day was held every year on March 4 (get it?) but I didn’t know anything about National Punctuation Day. It’s held every September 24.

To commemorate it, Mental Floss put together an infographic of little-known punctuation marks. I’d never heard of any of them. And some are under copyright? I didn’t even know you could copyright punctuation. Some of the public domain ones include:

  • Interrobang ‽
  • Snark Mark .~
  • Rhetorical Question Mark (see image)

These are kind of fun, but I wouldn’t use them except in jest. I don’t think Strunk and White had anything to say about them, and I have a purist streak. But if it suits you, then freely use that Certitude Point.

You are Neil Gaiman

Neil Gaiman is one of the bestselling, most talented, and most loved creators of our time. And you are him!

Well, you’re not literally him. Unless he’s somehow reading this. (If so: hi! I met you once, a long time ago. It was cool.) But you have something in common with him and you must never forget it.

There is a ton of great advice from Gaiman in this video: “You Learn By Finishing Things.” But this might be the most important piece:

Tell your story. Don’t try and tell the stories that other people can tell. … Start telling the stories that only you can tell. Because there will always be better writers than you and there will always be smarter writers than you. … But you are the only you. … There are better writers than me out there, there are smarter writers, there are people who can plot better, there’s all of those kinds of things.

But there’s nobody who can write a Neil Gaiman story like I can.

That right there. That’s how you are Neil Gaiman.

There is nobody who can write a [YOUR NAME HERE] story like you can.