2019 in Review: Reading

HenryBemisWell, 2019 happened, but you wouldn’t know it from reading my articles on this blog because there weren’t any. I’ll get to why that was in a future article, but for now, it’s time for my annual Henry Bemis article. Here are my reflections on the books I read in 2019.

The Apple-Icon icon indicates a book I read because one of my children read it for a school book report, and since I’m their homeschool reading teacher, I had to read it, too. All books on the list are fiction unless they bear the NF non-fiction icon.

  1. The Work of Mercy by Mark Shea NF
  2. Artemis by Andy Weir
  3. Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke
  4. Still Amidst the Storm by Conor Gallagher NF
  5. West is San Francisco by Lauren Sapala
  6. Will Wilder and the Amulet of Power by Raymond Arroyo
  7. The Glass Gargoyle by Marie Andreas
  8. The Shadow of the Torturer by Gene Wolfe
  9. Synthetic Men of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs
  10. The Claw of the Conciliator by Gene Wolfe
  11. Men of Iron by Howard Pyle Apple-Icon
  12. Madeleine Takes Command by Ethel C. Brill  Apple-Icon
  13. The House with a Clock In Its Walls by John Bellairs
  14. Thrawn by Timothy Zahn
  15. Little Robot by Ben Hatke
  16. Fluency by Jennifer Foehner Wells
  17. Countdown by Deborah Wiles
  18. Mother Knows Best by Serena Valentino
  19. Sinner by Lino Rulli NF
  20. Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes Apple-Icon
  21. If All the Swords in England by Barbara Willard Apple-Icon
  22. Misty of Chincoteague by Marguerite Henry Apple-Icon
  23. Conquerors’ Pride by Timothy Zahn
  24. The End and Other Beginnings by Veronica Roth
  25. Conquerors’ Heritage by Timothy Zahn
  26. Conquerors’ Legacy by Timothy Zahn
  27. Saint Rose of Lima by Mary Fabyan Windeatt Apple-Icon
  28. Starsight by Brandon Sanderson

Lowlights

meh The Shadow of the Torturer and The Claw of the Conciliator by Gene Wolfe

2019 shall be remembered as the year I gave Gene Wolfe the old college try. He’s hailed as a titan of science fiction, and he’s a Catholic whose faith is apparent from his work. That should have made his The Book of the New Sun series a slam-dunk with me, but it wasn’t. I’m glad I read the first two books in the series, but I’ve had enough. Everyone says Wolfe is a genius, but challenging to read. I’ll agree with that. Too difficult for me, I guess. When I have to read while switching between my Kindle app and Wikipedia just to get explanations for what the heck is going on, it’s not a good sign.

meh Mother Knows Best by Serena Valentino

I bought this on a BookBub deal, and I was expecting an interesting backstory for the villain of Tangled. Instead, I felt like I stumbled into the middle of a series. Which I did! It turns out the books in Valentino’s Disney Villains series aren’t just stand-alone origin stories for classic characters like Ursula and the Evil Queen, they’re also an ongoing tale about the Odd Sisters, a trio of evil witches exclusive to this series. That didn’t make this book terrible by any means, it just didn’t make it completely satisfying, either.

There were also two books I just wasn’t getting into this year, so I didn’t finish them.

I tried1200px-ProhibitionSign2.svg Red Rising by Pierce Brown (DNF at 31%)

I have friends who absolutely adore Red Rising, and I trust their judgment a lot, so I really wanted to like it. But I just kept feeling like I’d read it before when it was called The Hunger Games and Divergent. I couldn’t get into it. Sorry, Will. I may try it again someday.

1200px-ProhibitionSign2.svg Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge: A Crash of Fate by Zoraida Córdova (DNF at 35%)

I did love seeing all of the places from Disneyland’s Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge in A Crash of Fate, but when you strip away the Star Wars veneer, A Crash of Fate is a YA romance novel, and that’s just not my thing.

Highlights
91SxgwHMc0LTimothy Zahn! He’s always been one of my favorite authors thanks to a book you might have heard of called Star Wars: Heir to the Empire, and Grand Admiral Thrawn is one of my all-time favorite villains. So I was eager to finally dig into Thrawn, his take on Thrawn’s origin in the new official Star Wars continuity. What amazed me was seeing just how much his classic Heir to the Empire trilogy influenced me when I read it as a teenager. I heard a lot of my own writing voice in Thrawn, which I guess means I owe a lot of my writing voice to Timothy Zahn. I can think of much worse inspirations.

Thrawn wasn’t my favorite read of the year, but Timothy Zahn was my favorite read’s author. And so without further ado…

download1stPlace-SmallThe Conquerors’ Trilogy by Timothy Zahn

The Conquerors’ Trilogy is about future humans in a devastating war with an alien race, sparked by a first contact that went horribly wrong. Yes, you’ve read that a hundred times before. But what makes this different is the failed first contact was a huge misunderstanding. One that was deliberately instigated by unknown third parties for their own gain. And this trilogy isn’t the story of how a war was won. It’s the story of how determined individuals — both human and alien — come together to fight for the truth and for peace. I adored this trilogy.

2ndPlace-Smallartemis_1[1]Artemis by Andy Weir

I enjoyed the heck out of Artemis, Andy Weir’s sophomore novel. I felt like it had all the hard science and all the dramatic tension that made The Martian so spectacular. But on the moon. And told as a heist story! What’s not to love?

Also, I’m convinced Rudy, the former Canadian Mountie who now runs security on the moon, was inspired by Odo from Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. Rest in peace, René Auberjonois.

3rdPlace-SmallstarsightStarsight by Brandon Sanderson

And the guy who is quickly becoming my favorite author just because he keeps cranking out book after book after book that I love had a new YA novel this year. It should surprise no one that Starsight by Brandon Sanderson was one of my most favorite things I read this year. It took the series in directions I didn’t expect, kept me rapidly turning pages in pursuit of answers I needed, and was just a delightful read.

Honorable Mentions (in order in which I read them)

  • The Work of Mercy by Mark Shea NF
  • West is San Francisco by Lauren Sapala
  • Madeleine Takes Command by Ethel C. Brill  Apple-Icon
  • The House with a Clock In Its Walls by John Bellairs
  • Thrawn by Timothy Zahn
  • Sinner by Lino Rulli NF

Final Thoughts
2019 also turned out to be the year I stopped caring enough about having a “Currently Reading” widget on my blog to put up with the crummy UI of Goodreads. In the words of Alkaline Trio, “That’s it, we’ve had enough.” I removed the widget from this site, and I’m not updating my Goodreads account any longer. If you want to know what I’m reading, just ask me.

And if you want to know what I read in years past, here are links to my previous reading lists: 2018 | 2017 | 2016.

I promise to write more on this blog in 2020 than just this article.

2018 in Review: Reading

Most people write their “Year in Review” stories in December, but I’m not most people. I always wait to write mine until the new year has officially begun, especially my look back at the books I read in the past year. Because what if I finish a book on December 31? That book needs to be cataloged in the correct year! And guess what? This year, that policy paid off.

HenryBemisWelcome to the 2018 edition of my annual Henry Bemis article, named after the main character of The Twilight Zone episode “Time Enough at Last.” All he wanted to do was have the time to read as many books as he wanted. After he became the sole survivor of nuclear war, his wish came true — until he broke his glasses. In honor (and pity) of Henry, here are my reflections on the books I consumed over the last 365 days.

I finished 37 books this year, up from the 23 I read in 2017. The Apple-Icon icon indicates a book I read because one of my children read it for a school book report. And because my children are homeschooled, and because I’m their reading teacher, I kind of felt I had to read them, too.

  1. Oathbringer (The Stormlight Archive #3)
    Brandon Sanderson
  2. Patron Saint of First Communicants: The Story of Blessed Imelda Lambertini Apple-Icon
    Mary Fabyan Windeatt
  3. St. Gianna Beretta Molla: The Gift of Life Apple-Icon
    Susan Helen Wallace
  4. Mighty Jack
    Ben Hatke
  5. Mighty Jack and the Goblin King
    Ben Hatke
  6. Peterrific
    Victoria Kann
  7. Princess Academy
    Shannon Hale
  8. The Swords of Mars (Barsoom #8)
    Edgar Rice Burroughs
  9. Active Memory (Mirador #3)
    Dan Wells
  10. St. Thomas Aquinas Apple-Icon
    Mary Fabyan Windeatt
  11. Lexicon
    Max Barry
  12. (Beta read for a member of my writing group)
  13. The Small War of Sergeant Donkey Apple-Icon
    Maureen Daly
  14. (Beta read for a member of my writing group)
  15. The Gunslinger (The Dark Tower #1)
    Stephen King
  16. Sleep Writer
    Keith Robinson
  17. (Beta read for a member of my writing group)
  18. One Beautiful Dream
    Jennifer Fulwiler
  19. The Door in the Wall
    Marguerite de Angeli
  20. The Girl with the Red Balloon
    Katherine Locke
  21. The Winged Watchman
    Hilda van Stockum
  22. The Princess Bride
    William Goldman
  23. Artemis Fowl
    Eoin Colfer
  24. Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children
    Ransom Riggs
  25. Hollow City (Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children #2)
    Ransom Riggs
  26. Library of Souls (Miss Peregrine’s Peculiar Children #3)
    Ransom Riggs
  27. The Wise Man’s Fear (The Kingkiller Chronicle #2)
    Patrick Rothfuss
  28. Firefly Magic
    Lauren Sapala
  29. Esme’s Wish
    Elizabeth Foster
  30. Swiss Family Robinson (DNF) Apple-Icon
    Johann David Wyss
  31. The Fallen Star (Billy Smith and the Goblins #2)
    Robert Hewitt Wolfe
  32. Carve the Mark
    Veronica Roth
  33. This Tremendous Lover
    Dom Eugene Boylan
  34. The Fates Divide (Carve the Mark #2)
    Veronica Roth
  35. Ogre Enchanted
    Gail Caron Levine
  36. We Are Okay
    Nina LaCour
  37. Pippi Longstocking Apple-Icon
    Astrid Lindgren
  38. Skyward
    Brandon Sanderson

There are two complete series in there. I’d wanted to read Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children for some time, and when I finally did this year, I didn’t stop until I’d read the entire trilogy. (Book 4 wasn’t out yet when I finished.) I also finally got to Carve the Mark by Veronica Roth and immediately went into the final book of the duology, The Fates Divide.

I’d wanted to read both The Princess Bride and The Wise Man’s Fear for some time, and I finally got to both this year. I enjoyed The Wise Man’s Fear very much, but I’m beginning to fear The Kingkiller Chronicle will never be completed. And many consider the film The Princess Bride to be just as good, if not better, than the book, which is rare. But while both are fantastic, I enjoyed the book more, mostly for the details about young Inigo Montoya.

I had no idea Gail Carson Levine, one of my favorite authors, was releasing a new book this year, but I bought Ogre Enchanted as soon as I saw it, and I thoroughly enjoyed it. I also enjoyed the conclusion of Dan Wells’s Mirador series, Active Memory.

Yep, I have a great big “Did Not Finish” in there. My son read Swiss Family Robinson for a book report, but I could not bring myself to finish it. Too many long passages that just described the ingenious ways the family survived on the island and not enough plot for me. The movie was better! (I don’t think I’ve ever said that before…)

I completed a couple of non-fiction books this year. Firefly Magic by Lauren Sapala taught me everything I know about marketing, which isn’t as bad as I thought it was! I strongly related to One Beautiful Dream by Jennifer Fulwiler, which chronicled her efforts to have both an artistic career (as writer and Sirius XM talk show host) and raise a large family. And This Tremendous Lover was one of the best spiritual books I’ve ever read. It is deep, but if you have the patience to slowly walk through it and soak it in, I highly recommend it.

I began the year with Brandon Sanderson’s Oathbringer, and I ended it with his Skyward. And yes, I finished Skyward on December 31, so if I’d written this article early, it would have been incomplete.

And the winner is…
So which were my favorites? Which books I read in 2018 did I enjoy the most? There were three.

The Princess Bride is an absolute classic. It’s required reading for anyone who enjoys stories.

And while I enjoyed the heck out of the Miss Peregrine series, I think I liked Carve the Mark and The Fates Divide just a little bit more. The plot and world of Carve the Mark were just as awesome as Miss Peregrine, but I kind of have a word crush on Veronica Roth’s prose. I could read her books solely to study how she puts words together into sentences.

If you want to jump into the DeLorean and go back in time, here are my past reading lists: 2017 | 2016.